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10th Duhok International Film Festival to last until Dec. 16

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10th Duhok International Film Festival to last until Dec. 16

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Nov 18, 2021 10:27 pm

https://www.rudaw.net/contentfiles/6147 ... on=2771657

8th Duhok International Film Festival

The 8th Duhok International Film Festival kicked off on Monday, bringing local and international films to the Kurdistan Region

    93 films are being screened during the one-week festival
“Without a doubt, cinema is an important and effective art that can deliver many important and humanitarian messages to people. Cinema can also play an effective role in raising awareness among society and developing it,” said Kurdistan Region President Masrour Barzani at the festival opening.

The festival's first presentation was the Kurdish film Azmoon [The Exam], directed by Shawkat Amin Kurki.

44 Kurdish films will be screened at the festival, as well as 49 others from 30 different countries.

Each movie is being judged by three different committees.

An award will be given to the winning movie at the end of the festival.

Link to Article - Video:

https://www.rudaw.net/english/culture/18112021
Last edited by Anthea on Fri Dec 17, 2021 12:06 am, edited 2 times in total.
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10th Duhok International Film Festival to last until Dec. 16

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Re: 8th Duhok International Film Festival held in the Kurdis

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Nov 23, 2021 10:34 pm

Awards and Winners

Duhok International Film Festival wraps up

ERBIL, Kurdistan Region - Sidik and the Panther, by filmmaker Rebar Doski, won the best Kurdish feature film at the 8th Duhok International Film Festival, which wrapped on Monday with an award ceremony.

Sidik and the Panther tells the story of a man who travels through the mountains of the Kurdistan Region in search of a snow leopard, believed to be extinct in the area. He dreamed that if he found one, the area would become a national park and bombs would no longer be dropped on it.

“We are very proud of this festival. This festival has to continue,” Doski said in an interview with the festival. He added that he hoped more cinemas would open in Duhok. “I hope four, five cinemas are opened and I will be more pleased.”

The weeklong festival showcased 44 Kurdish and 49 international films in Kurdistan Region’s mountainous Duhok city.

Navid Farjzdadeh won best actor award for the film Zalava, a horror drama set in a remote mountainous Kurdish village called Zalava where villagers believe a demon is among them. The film’s director, Arsalan Amiri, also won the best director award.

“I am happy that the Duhok film festival gets better each year and Kurdish cinema is also getting better each year. Kurdish cinema has good movies this year as well,” Amiri said.

Best actress went to Maryam Boubani for her role in Sisters Apart, a film about a Kurdish soldier going on a mission to find her missing sister in Erbil, among female fighters.

Holy Bread, directed by Rahim Zabihi, about impoverished Kurdish kolbars who transport goods across dangerous border areas and mountains for a living, won the best Kurdish documentary award.

Great Istanbul Depression, directed by Zeynep Dilan Suren, won best international short film. It tells the tale of two university graduates looking for a job on the edge of the metropolis.

The Other Side of The River by Antonia Kilian won best international documentary film. The movie is about a 19-year-old escaping an arranged marriage. She crosses the Euphrates River and finds her new home with the Kurdish Women’s Protection Units (YPJ) who liberate her hometown Manbij from the Islamic State (ISIS).

https://www.rudaw.net/english/culture/22112021
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Re: Awards and Winners in Duhok International Film Festival

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Dec 17, 2021 12:02 am

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5th Sulaimani International Film Festival

The 5th Sulaimani International Film Festival begins on Friday, bringing together local and international actors and directors

The festival aims to grow the Kurdish film industry and improve the level of filmmaking in the Region. It also aims to attract international filmmakers, producers, and film production companies.

Organizers of the annual festival began planning the event six months in advance. The event will take place in Sulaimani’s Talary Hunar [Art Palace] from December 17 to 23.

In the course of the one-week festival, 142 films of different categories and from 33 countries will be screened.

“Films from all categories are included. These include long films, short films, animated films, and documentaries. We have a category for youths. We’ve created a category called "Kurdish View," which presents short Kurdish movies for the younger generation,” Lanya Raza, program manager of the festival told Rudaw’s Horvan Rafaat on Wednesday.

Raza also added that “Over half of our guests will be from outside the Kurdistan Region, coming from all over the world. Nearly 35 countries will take part in the festival.”

The festival is intended to introduce Kurdish cinema and screen international films for cinephiles.

Harde Samir is the director of a Kurdish short film called “A Hallway.” The short film is inspired by a true story of two brothers who were taken hostage by the former Iraqi Baathist regime in the 1980s.

As the regime decides to release one of them and execute the other, the mother has to decide who is going to be freed.

Hoping his first-ever short film will catch the attention of the festival-goers, Harde aims to tell the younger generation about the hardships the Kurds suffered under the rule of the former Iraqi regime. “I would like the Kurdish people to see this story so they know how our history was,” said Samir on Wednesday.

During the festival, a total of 116 movies will enter a competition to win awards by the festival organizers.

In addition to the 57 Kurdish films that will be screened at the festival, a number of panels, workshops, and seminars will also be held by international and local actors and directors, aiming to improve the quality of Kurdish cinema.

Despite being an annual festival, it was not held last year because of the coronavirus pandemic. The 4th Sulaimani International Film Festival was held in September of 2019.

In a similar event, the 8th Duhok International Film Festival kicked off in November, bringing local and international films to the Kurdistan Region.

Link to Article - Video:

https://www.rudaw.net/english/culture/16122021
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Re: 5th Sulaimani International Film Festival December 17 to

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Dec 20, 2021 11:10 pm

Turkey blocked Kurdish film

Turkey is being accused of pressuring organizers of a film festival in the city of Sulaimaniyah in Iraqi Kurdistan to cancel the screening of an award-winning entry depicting the resistance put up by the youth wing of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) against the Turkish army during its three-month-long siege of Sur, the historic heart of Diyarbakir, in 2016

While the exact death toll remains unknown, hundreds of civilians are thought to have died in an urban insurrection that began in 2015 when the PKK declared autonomy in a string of predominantly Kurdish towns and cities across the southeast and left entire neighborhoods, including Sur, in ruins. The UN said in a report that Turkey had committed vast abuses, including unlawful killings of women and children.

The film “Ji Bo Azadiye” or “The End Will Be Spectacular” is based on the diaries of young fighters in Sur.

The Turkish state typically intervenes with foreign governments to suppress cultural events, the erection of monuments and the like that refer to past atrocities against ethnic and religious minorities, notably Armenians and Kurds. In this particular case, Turkey allegedly enlisted Kurds to act against their own brethren, sowing divisions and feelings of betrayal.

Organizers of the fifth annual Sulaimaniyah International Film Festival informed director Ersin Celik that his film was being withdrawn just hours before its scheduled showing on Dec. 18. The organizers claimed it was because the film did not meet the requirement that films competing in the feature film category be no more than two years old. Celik’s film was shot in Kobani, a town on the Syrian Kurdish border that won international fame with its epic resistance against the Islamic State, and released in 2019.

Lina Raza, director of programming, told Al-Monitor, “This has nothing to do with political pressure at all. It has to do with our rules.” Why had it taken the organizers so long to realize that "Ji Bo Azadiye" didn’t qualify? “There were 142 films," Raza said. "I asked all the directors to tell the truth.”

She went on, “This is about trust between me and the directors,” and sent Al-Monitor a screen shot from the festival’s webpage via WhatsApp outlining the rules.

However, Celik and his co-producer Diyar Hesso gave an entirely different version of events that was supported by correspondence between themselves and the festival organizers and a screen shot from the festival’s website with the rules for Kurdish cinema. It states, “No requirement.” Hesso charged that the organizers had amended the page today to fit their own narrative. Raza did not respond to Al-Monitor’s request for comment regarding the claim.

Celik told Al-Monitor that he offered a compromise whereby the film was withdrawn from the competition but shown at the scheduled time “so as to spare the organizers embarrassment and shame.” That offer was spurned, reinforcing suspicions that Turkish officials were behind the affair.

Celik, who left Turkey in 2013 after being convicted of spreading “terrorist propaganda” for his work as a journalist on police abuse, acknowledged that he had no proof. However, he added, that he did believe that Turkey was to blame for the affair because it had sought to prevent the film from being shown at other festivals. “In some instances they succeeded, in others they didn’t,” Celik said.

Turkey has arguably more economic leverage over the Iraqi Kurds than any other country, including Iran and the United States. Iraqi Kurdish oil, a big source of revenue, is exported despite an ongoing legal challenge from Baghdad through a pipeline that runs to loading terminals at Turkey’s Mediterranean port of Ceyhan.

Ankara has used that leverage to deploy thousands of troops and fight its war against the PKK across Iraqi Kurdistan. The PKK accuses the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP), which wields the greatest power in the Kurdistan Regional Government, of colluding with Turkey. Tensions between the PKK and the KDP escalated over the summer, resulting in deadly clashes.

The Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), which prevails in Sulaimaniyah, has traditionally enjoyed closer ties with the PKK. But it has come under mounting pressure from Ankara to curb the latter’s activities since August 2017 when the PKK abducted three Turkish intelligence operatives.

Winthrop Rodgers, an independent commentator on Kurdish affairs based in Sulaimaniyah, noted, “The PUK has always been subject to pressures from Turkey and has acted on it.” He cited another example of Turkish-driven censorship from January 2019, when the Asayish, the name for internal security forces, closed down Sinema Salim, a local cafe and movie theater just before it was supposed to show a film about Sakine Cansiz on the anniversary of her killing. Cansiz was a founding member of the PKK who was assassinated by a Turkish citizen with alleged links to Turkey’s intelligence services in Paris in January 2013.

The cafe was allowed to reopen but was denied permission to screen "Ji Bo Azadiye" earlier this year.

In November 2018 the PUK shut down all the offices of the PKK-friendly Kurdistan Free Society Movement. “The belief at the time, which was never really refuted, was that both of those [moves] came under Turkish pressure and as an apparent act of appeasement,” Rodgers told Al-Monitor. The aim was to get Ankara to reopen its airspace to flights from Sulaimaniyah's airport, which had been closed by Baghdad in response to the Iraqi Kurds’ referendum on independence. Ankara continued to enforce the ban even after Baghdad lifted it. Flights resumed in January 2019.

The latest accusations of Turkish meddling arose when the PUK moved against Lahur Talabani, a senior PUK figure who is openly sympathetic to the PKK and hostile to Turkey.

Ankara’s bullying doesn’t always work. In 2016, the Turkish government tried to get Swedish authorities to ban the screening of “Bakur” or "Turkish Kurdistan," an award-winning documentary detailing the daily lives of PKK fighters that features top PKK commanders Cemil Bayik and Fehman Huseyin. They refused.

Ertugurul Mavioglu, a veteran Turkish journalist who co-directed the film, was sentenced to six years in prison for “propagating terrorism” and currently lives in exile in Greece. He told Al-Monitor, “Not only is it probable, it is absolutely certain that Turkey prevented the screening of 'Ji Bo Azadiye.'”

https://www.al-monitor.com/originals/20 ... m-festival
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Re: 5th Sulaimani International Film Festival December 17 to

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Dec 09, 2023 10:46 pm

Duhok International Film Festival

ERBIL (Kurdistan) – The 10th Duhok Film Festival, sponsored by Kurdistan 24, kicked off on Saturday by Chairman Ameer Ali Muhammad Tahir at Duhok University, where it is scheduled to last until Dec. 16

Kurdish filmmaker Mansour Jahani told Kurdistan 24 that the festival opened with the film ‘Baghdad Messi’ directed by Kurdish filmmaker Sahim Omar Kalifa.

Mr. Jahani revealed that the members of the jury for the international competition section have been appointed.

The jury includes Emin Alper, who is the jury’s president, Iranian director and screenwriter Mahsa Mohib Ali, Indian novelist and screenwriter Nirmal Dehl, Polish actor Arthur Zeborsky, and journalist Shabnam Zaryab.

Rawand Zaid, the planning director for the festival, said that seven films have been selected for the competition and documentary section, which are ‘The Taste of Water’ directed by Ibrahim Saeedi, ‘Hiding Saddam’ directed by Halkawt Mustafa, ‘Nisho Flute’ directed by Sedat Kiran, ‘Girls of Suntown’ directed by Rebar Dosky, ‘Hidden Beauty of Iraq’ directed by Sahim Omar Khalifa and Jürgen Bode, ‘The Reality of Spirituality’ by Durim Tekinoğlu and ‘The Story of Dukan Cave’ by Nabez Ahmed.

Furthermore, 12 films had been selected for the short story category, while nine films had been selected for the World Cinema Competition section.

The festival will screen 116 films from diverse countries in a framework of high-budget films, short films, and documentaries under the slogan "Kurdish Language," stressing the preservation of the Kurdish mother tongue in foreign countries.

Previously in November, another Kurdish festival, the 14th annual Hamburg Kurdish Film Festival (HKFF), was held in Germany with the presence of the large Kurdish diaspora in Europe. Notably, the festival screened 19 films covering a range of topics such as Kurdish resistance, women’s rights, and ongoing crimes against the ethnic group.

https://www.kurdistan24.net/en/story/33 ... -kicks-off
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